RCC Honors History Project

Whats in a name? — “Los Ahn-heh-lehs”

Posted by kameron1 on June 8, 2009

Translation Nation

“In 1769 an expedition of priests and exploreres had given the settlement its name–lohs-AHN-heh-lehs in the original Castillian pronunciation, before it became loss-ANN-juh-liss.” (196).

 

Spanish/Castilian dialect

Castilian, which contains many words of Arabic origin, began as a dialect spoken in northern Spain. It became the language of the court of the kingdoms of Castile and León in the 12th century, and the dominance of Castile within Spain allowed it to become the official language of the state.

There are differences in accent and, to a lesser extent, in vocabulary in Castilian as it is spoken in various regions of the country. The most significant difference is in the pronunciation of c before i or e. In northern Castile, where the language is said to be spoken in its purest form, this is pronounced as an English th; in southern and western Spain it is pronounced as an English s. The prominence of people from these latter regions in the colonization of Latin America led to their pronunciation becoming the standard in American Spanish.

Alfonso X-King of Castile and Leon, 1252 to 1284

Alfonso’s court scholars wrote mostly in Castilian Spanish, which they made a literary language by regularizing the syntax and by borrowing—and defining—words for concepts not previously discussed. In their Premera crónica general, they tried to determine historical facts from chronicle, folklore, and Arabic sources. Less factual was their Gran e general estoria, a world history, with extensive translations from the Old Testament. The Tablas Alfonsíes were planetary tables, based on an Arabic source but updated by observations at Toledo 1262–72. Siete partidas was the most important law code. It was based on Roman law and contained discourses on manners and morals and an idea of the king and his people as a corporation—superior to feudal arrangements—with the king as agent of both God and the people. After Alfonso’s death, Siete partidas was proclaimed the law of all Castile and Leon in 1348, and the language of Alfonso’s court evolved into modern Castilian Spanish.

link– http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/98582/Castilian-dialect

 

Where Did the Name Los Angeles Come From?

The name Los Angeles is Spanish for The Angels. There is much more to this name, however. On Wednesday, August 2, 1769, Father Juan Crespi, a Franciscan priest accompanying the first European land expedition through California, led by Captain Fernando Rivera Y Moncado, described in his journal a “beautiful river from the northwest” located at “34 degrees 10 minutes.” They named the river Nuestra Señora de los Angeles de la Porciúncula. In the Franciscan calendar, August 2 was the day of the celebration of the feast of the Perdono at the tiny Assisi chapel of St. Francis of Assisi. Early in St. Francis’ life, the Benedictines had given him this tiny chapel for his use near Assisi. The chapel, ruined and in need of repair, was located on what the Italians called a porziuncola or “very small parcel of land.” Painted on the wall behind the altar was a fresco of the Virgin Mary surrounded by angels. Now contained within a Basilica, the chapel was named Saint Mary of the Angels at the Little Portion. The newly discovered “beautiful river” was named in honor of this celebration and this chapel. In 1781, a new settlement was established along that river. The settlement came to be known as El Pueblo de Nuestra Señora la Reina de los Angeles de Porciúncula or The Town of Our Lady the Queen of Angels of the Little Portion although its official name was simply El Pueblo de la Reina de Los Angeles.

link— http://www.laalmanac.com/history/hi03a.htm

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